Mrs. Ryan's Class

A Digital Learning Hub for students and parents

Getting started with technology integration

on May 19, 2016

Technology integration in the general education classroom can feel like a daunting task for any educator. The first step is to try not to be overwhelmed by the immense amount of digital tools and resources that are available. A good place to start is simple by thinking about what you want to teach, and then decide how technology can enhance the objective or elevate some aspect of student learning.

start

 

In the Eduopia article, Technology Integration Research Review, Vanessa Vega outlines three key elements of effective integration of technology. They are listed as:

  • “Students playing an active role in their learning and receiving frequent, personalized feedback”
  • “Students critically analyzing and actively creating media messages”
  • “Teachers connecting classroom activities to the world outside the classroom” (Vega, 2013)

In many ways, these indicators represent great teaching and student learning and could take place without the presence of technology. Technology, however, can enhance teaching and learning to make these elements more meaningful and accessible. I recommend that classroom teachers start by using technology to facilitate one of these key elements at first, and work towards full technology integration when appropriate.

Robert Marzano and John Hattie agree that at times, a lack of technology is appropriate to help students internalize content and make connections. These expert educational researchers have outlined multiple indicators of successful strategies for effective teaching strategies, and author Shaun Killian of The Australian Society for Evidence Based Teaching compiled a list of recommended teaching strategies called 8 Strategies Robert Marzano & John Hattie Agree On

Any teacher who wishes to enhance their content area teaching with technology should use this list of reasonable and realistic strategies to accomplish their teaching objectives. When I wrote the lesson plan Organisms in Our World, I chose three of Marzano and Hattie’s strategies to enhance an already existing lesson that I teach my third graders. I wanted to enhance my students’ experience with a real-world understanding of the Tundra Habitat so I used “Strategy 3: Get the Students to Engage With the Content” and included live stream videos from explore.org.

I also chose to enhance the content standard of the lesson, 3-LS4-3. Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all using Marzano and Hattie’s Strategy  7: Get Students Working Together by assigning mixed ability partnerships, and Strategy 5: Multiple Exposures by including video, note taking, and online research on kid safe search engines (www.juniorsafesearch.com, kidrex.com, kidsclick.com). Finally, students take an active role in working toward this content standard through collaborative online content construction on a class blog on edublogs.org.

It is imperative to align technology to content standards to help our students work toward their highest potential. Our world is more connected than ever, and technology can help students become an active part of their learning and their world. The use of free technology tools can help students make connections, construct knowledge, and share ideas with a large audience. Free tools and web-resources like edublogs.com and explore.org help teachers anywhere enhance their teaching and student learning.

 

References:

Edutopia. “An Introduction to Technology Integration.YouTube. YouTube, 2012. Web. 17 May 2016.

Killian, Shaun. “8 Strategies Robert Marzano & John Hattie Agree On.” The Australian Society for Evidence Based Teaching. A+, 17 June 2015. Web. 15 May 2016.

Robert J. Marzano.Marzano Research. Web. 17 May 2016.

Vega, Vanessa. “Technology Integration Research Review.” Edutopia. 2013. Web. 17 May 2016.

“What Works in Education – Hattie’s List of the Greatest Effects and Why It Matters.” Granted and. 2012. Web. 17 May 2016.

Advertisements

3 responses to “Getting started with technology integration

  1. keelygarden says:

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts and the video clip. I will have to try find something similar to show my students what life is like in other areas of the world. I love to use Crash Course History videos in my class. I used to show the videos from start to finish but more recently I have realized that I can use the clip in my own way. Now I take a sampling, ask students to watch specific timed sections, or offer them as a resource for students who missed class, and parents who want to help their students with content. The more I work with technology, the more I realize I can adapt what is out there to meet my students’ needs.

    Like

  2. Laura Greenstein says:

    Your ideas show deep understanding of the importance of the alignment of technology with purposeful teaching and learning. I like your insight that Vanessa Vega’s ideas are relevant with or without technology. And, as you noted, Hattie and Marzano agree.
    It sounds like you were able to extend your current practice by using selected technologies purposefully and also to use technology seamlessly in your lesson design so as to engage learners and enhance learning. I hope you have opportunities to share your wonderful ideas with others.

    Like

  3. John Vieira says:

    Nicole, thank you for sharing these helpful resources. I will definitely give them a try the next time I want to integrate technology into a lesson that could use it. It is interesting to see how you are applying what we learned from previous classes in the program (OCC) with what we are doing now in integrating technology into our lessons. I thought this was a very useful project, as shown through your work, in that it made us think about a lesson we currently have and enhance it with technology.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: